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facts-i-just-made-up:

One of the most astounding mysteries of the world is this ancient tile pattern in Greece, dated to about 1,500 B.C.

It was little more than a curiosity until 2008 when its resemblance to a QR Code was recognized.  First photographed in 1871 by the British Antiquities Society, they were known as the “Chinese Box Tiles” owing to the closest thing anyone had seen to the strange pattern.  Little was known about the titles except that they were installed along with other beachfront roads on the isle of Igrigoria in ancient times.

In was in 2008 that QR codes became popular enough that a traveler recognized the tiles as bearing an unmistakable resemblance to the computer code which had only been developed 3,500 years after the tiles were first laid.  It was another two years before anyone with a QR capable phone traveled to the island to attempt a capture.

The mystery only deepened when the phone was able to recognize the code, which lead to the original Nyan Cat video on youtube.

sixpenceee:

MANGBETU TRIBE AND SKULL ELONGATION

Here’s something intense.

The Mangbetu tribe elongated their skulls. The custom is called Lipombo. It was a status and beauty symbol but the Belgian government soon outlawed it. 

They managed to achieve this by wrapping the heads of newborns tightly with cloth to give them a streamlined look. 

MORE INFORMATION

"In a now famous remark, Edward Gibbons observed that ‘of the first fifteen emperors Claudius was the only one whose taste in love was entirely correct’, meaning heterosexual. If Gibbon was right, the Roman Empire was ruled for almost 200 consecutive years by men whose homosexual interests, if not exclusive, were sufficiently noteworthy to be included for posterity."

Christianity, Social Tolerance, and Homosexuality by John Boswell.

"But," added W.C. Firebaugh in 1966, “Claudius was a moron.”

(via homosexualityandcivilization)
"When a general celebrated a triumph, the Vestals hung an effigy of the fascinus [phallic amulet] on the underside of his chariot to protect him from [the evil eye]."
imageFascinus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
reminder than the romans invented truck nutz tm (via 3liza)

medievalpoc:

Ancient Art Week!

Various Roman Sculptures

Out of the many works of art that survive from Roman times, some only exist as fragments. I wanted to share some of these fragments with you all because I think a lot of people underestimate just how many images of Romans of color exist.

Some of these are from Roman Egypt, some are copies of Greek originals, some are actually small vases or perfume bottles,  but each one has been determined to be a Black person by the W.E.B. DuBois Institute at Harvard University and included in their Image of the Black in Western Art collection.

On the heels of the conversation (controversy?) yesterday about Sleeping Black Man and some of the questions asked that may not have been answered (or have answers), I wanted to showcase how diverse these pieces are, and how different from each other they look. They come from all walks of life, are of various ages, and each one seems highly individual, rather than of a type. Some may be portraits. Some may be intended as caricatures or amusing pieces, like the old man sticking out his tongue.

Roman terracottas were produced everywhere from England to Egypt, and each area has its own distinct styles.The small bottles, called unguentariums or balsamariums, are debated within academic circles as to what they were actually used for. The marbles are most likely portraits, but usually descriptions or textual analogs for individual sculptures don’t survive.

1. Bust of a black man or woman with tight corkscrew curls, painted eyes, and slightly open mouth. Roman, 2nd half II century A.D. Marble. Napoli, Museo Nazionale.

2. Head of an Egyptian man with a large lump on top of his head, which is shaved except for a braid (?) hanging down the back. Roman, early IV century A.D. Marble. Walters Art Gallery, Baltimore.

3. Head of a black youth with tight curls and slightly open mouth (nose and chin damaged). Roman, n.d. Gray Basalt, 20 cm. Napoli, Museo Nazionale.

4. Bust of a black man; part of top and back of head missing. Roman, Imperial Period. Bronze, 8.6 cm. London, Collection of Herbert James Powell Bomford.

5. Balsamarium in form of a bust of a black youth wearing a necklace. Roman, n.d. Bronze, 13 cm. Musée national du Louvre, Département des Antiquités grecques et romaines.

6. Statuette fragment: Head of a black man or woman with a diadem encircling a voluminous coiffure. Roman, 1st. Century B.C.E. Terracotta. Cittá del Vaticano, Musei Vaticani, Museo Gregoriano Egizio.

7. Head of an old man sticking out his tongue. Roman, n.d. Terracotta. Houston, Texas, Menil Foundation Collection.

8. Head of a laughing man wearing a smooth beret. Roman, 1st. Century B.C.E. Terracotta, 3.9 cm. Houston, Texas, Menil Foundation Collection.

9. Statuette (fragment): Head of a black man with puffed-out cheeks. Roman Egypt, n.d. Terracotta, 4.2 cm. London, British Museum, Department of Greek and Roman Antiquities.

10. Statuette fragment: head of a child. Roman, n.d. Terracotta, 3.4 cm. Houston, Texas, Menil Foundation Collection.


Funerary urn for holding the ashes of Sellia Epyre. Her name appears on the cover, while the name of Quintus Futius Olympicus (in genitive case, perhaps her husband) appears on its belly in a different script. The inscription reads: Sellia / Epyre / de sacra via / aurivestrix // Q(uinti) Futi OlympiciSellia Epyre made and sold clothes that were embellished with gold, thus her profession: aurivestrix. Her shop was on the Sacra Via in Rome. 1st half of 1st century A.D., from RomeMuseo Nazionale Romano (Terme di Diocleziano), Roma

Funerary urn for holding the ashes of Sellia Epyre. Her name appears on the cover, while the name of Quintus Futius Olympicus (in genitive case, perhaps her husband) appears on its belly in a different script. The inscription reads: 
Sellia / Epyre / de sacra via / aurivestrix // Q(uinti) Futi Olympici

Sellia Epyre made and sold clothes that were embellished with gold, thus her profession: aurivestrix. Her shop was on the Sacra Via in Rome. 

1st half of 1st century A.D., from Rome

Museo Nazionale Romano (Terme di Diocleziano), Roma

"Sometimes full of joy, and yet again sad, waiting to see whether Fate will hear us."
— from Beethoven’s letters
discardingimages:

hairy Mary of Egyptmissal and book of hours, Lombardy ca. 1385-1390.
Paris, BnF, Latin 757, fol. 343v

discardingimages:

hairy Mary of Egypt

missal and book of hours, Lombardy ca. 1385-1390.

Paris, BnF, Latin 757, fol. 343v